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Article
September 20, 1941

ACUTE INFECTIOUS GINGIVOSTOMATITISETIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL PICTURE OF A COMMON DISORDER CAUSED BY THE VIRUS OF HERPES SIMPLEX

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1941;117(12):999-1005. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820380021007
Abstract

Inflammation of the mouth is a relatively common clinical condition among children, particularly of the outpatient class. In a number of cases the stomatitis is due to some known condition such as trauma, avitaminosis, metallic poisons, thrush, certain uncommon bacterial infections (Corynebacterium diphtheriae or Neisseria gonorrheae) and that which accompanies the exanthems. However, there remains a clinically common group about the cause of which there has been considerable doubt.

Uncertainty as to the etiology of this condition has led to a variety of names, over thirty synonyms in all being applied to it. Some of these are descriptive, e. g. catarrhal, aphthous, membranous or ulcerative, while some are based on the etiology, e. g. "Vincent's" or "fusospirochetal." Although fusospirochetal organisms are frequently encountered in this disease, many authors have questioned their causal relationship. These organisms are not recoverable from all cases presenting a similar clinical appearance, while on the other

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