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Article
September 27, 1941

Cancer Mortality in the United States. III. Geographic Variation in Recorded Cancer Mortality for Detailed Sites, for an Average of the Years 1930-32

Author Affiliations
 

By Mary Gover, Associate Statistician, U. S. Public Health Service. From the Division of Public Health Methods, National Institute of Health. Prepared by direction of the Surgeon General. Federal Security Agency, U. S. Public Health Service. Public Health Bulletin No. 257. Paper. Price, 15 cents. Pp. 81, with 18 illustrations. Washington, D. C.: Supt. of Doc., Government Printing Office, 1940.

JAMA. 1941;117(13):1138-1139. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820390080034

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Abstract

A study was made of the geographic variations in cancer mortality in the United States in which rates for specific sites of cancer were computed from unpublished tabulations made available by the Bureau of the Census. All rates are corrected to a standard age distribution; that is, to the age distribution of the total population of the United States as enumerated in 1930. In this manner, differences in the age composition of different sections of the country are eliminated. Also all rates are computed specifically for sex and color. The following findings are presented:

Recorded cancer mortality varies in different sections of the United States. The range of variation in the rate for all cancer for both sexes is from 127 in Rhode Island to 56 per hundred thousand in Arkansas. A high rate for cutaneous cancer among both sexes was found in the South. There was also a high

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