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Article
October 25, 1941

Cerebrospinal Fever

Author Affiliations
 

By Denis Brinton, D.M., F.R.C.P., Physician in Charge of the Department for Nervous Diseases, St. Mary's Hospital, London. Cloth. Price, $3. Pp. 163, with illustrations. Baltimore: William Wood & Company, 1941.

JAMA. 1941;117(17):1487. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820430083036

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Abstract

In the preface the author states that "pictures have been deliberately avoided except for four photographs of the sulfonamide eruption" and "but the dreary repetition of pictures used in most accounts of cerebrospinal fever during the last twenty-five years has not commended itself." This point of view in respect to the value of illustrations is in harmony with that of other British medical writers. But what is much more important, antiquated expressions concerning the pathway of the organism and the pathology of the disease have been supplanted by modern conceptions. All aspects of the infection, including a brief history, are presented in concise form. Particular attention is given to chemotherapy, a preference for sulfapyridine being shown. Commendation seems to be bestowed on English clinicians for innovations in treatment which they have inagurated since 1937, the year of the advent of chemotherapy. But approximately three years earlier intrathecal treatment was discarded

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