October 25, 1941

Lymphatics, Lymph, and Lymphoid Tissue: Their Physiological and Clinical Significance

Author Affiliations

By Cecil Kent Drinker, M.D., D.Sc., Professor of Physiology, School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, and Joseph Mendel Yoffey, M.Sc., M.D., F.R.C.S., Senior Lecturer in Anatomy, University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, Cardiff, Wales. Cloth. Price, $4. Pp. 406, with 50 illustrations. Cambridge: Harvard University Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1941.

JAMA. 1941;117(17):1488. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820430084039

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The primary purpose of this book is to present the physiologic and clinical significance of the lymphatic system in animals; accordingly, the authors have attempted to discuss the relation of the lymphatic apparatus to animal function. In addition to a fairly complete bibliography and the well arranged and thorough author and subject indexes, the contents include nine chapters devoted to anatomic and physiologic organization of the lymphatic apparatus, permeability of blood capillaries and its relation to lymph formation, permeability of lymphatics, lymph flow and lymph pressure, chemical composition and physical characteristics of lymph, biologic significance of lymphoid tissue, cell content of lymph, the lymphocyte and practical considerations.

This volume represents a wealth of material on the physiology of the lymphatic system and should serve as an authoritative source of information. While the book, in general, may appeal only to the laboratory or clinical investigator, the section entitled Practical Considerations will

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