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Article
March 21, 1931

TRANSFUSION DONORS AS SOURCES OF IMMUNE SERUM FOR TREATMENT OF POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1931;96(12):935-937. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720380023007
Abstract

Since human immune serum is the only available substance having a generally recognized specific therapeutic effect in poliomyelitis, and since to be effective it must be used early in the disease, it is of the greatest importance that adequate supplies of serum, preferably of known neutralizing value, be on hand, or at least that potential donors of such serum be quickly available. Every one who has dealt with the problem in the presence of an epidemic is familiar with the considerable difficulties in satisfactorily solving it. The majority of cases of poliomyelitis occur in children, many of them so young that only small amounts of blood can be obtained from each even as late as two years after convalescence. Hence, as a rule where pools of convalescent serum are kept on hand they are made up of small samples from various sources. As the basis for such practice it is

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