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From the JAMA Network
May 3, 2016

Recognizing Sun Safety as an Employee Health Issue

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora
  • 2Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora
  • 3Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver
  • 4Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora
JAMA. 2016;315(17):1894-1895. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.1008

In the September 2015 issue of JAMA Dermatology, Walkosz et al1 reported the results of a survey of 98 local government organizations based in Colorado cities, counties, and tax districts regarding the adoption of sun safety policies. Of these organizations, 87% had policies directing workers to wear hats, protective clothing, and eyewear, but these policies rarely cited sun protection as the reason. Few employer policies included environmental controls such as shade (3%, 3/98), work hours (1%, 1/98), and training (1%, 1/98). Sunscreen was included in only 16% (16/98) of policies. Also, few employers provided access to sun protection resources, such as hats and sunscreen. Walkosz et al1 found that workplace policies related to sun protection were less common in government organizations located farther from urban areas, suggesting that greater efforts to improve policies are needed in rural communities.

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