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Article
March 21, 1931

TRAUMATIC ULNAR NEURITIS THE ELBOW AND THE OPERATING DUE TO STRAPPING OF FOREARM TO THE TABLE

JAMA. 1931;96(12):944. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.27220380004010e
Abstract

The ulnar nerve traversing the epicondylar groove of the humerus in a subcutaneous position is apt to be injured through changes either within itself or in the surrounding tissues. Scar tissue formation in the groove caused by bruises and small hemorrhages may compress this structure and thus irritate it. When one considers the fact that the ulnar nerve with each flexion-extension movement at the elbow moves half an inch or more, one realizes the ease with which changes in the groove through which it traverses may irritate and alter its functions. In the next few paragraphs I shall describe the case of a young man, aged 24, who was taken to the operating room for herniorrhaphy. The upper extremities were strapped to the table in the usual manner. Soon after the reaction from the anesthetic he noticed a peculiar feeling of numbness in the little and ring fingers of the

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