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Article
November 22, 1941

THE RELATIVE EFFECTS OF SEVERAL SUBSTANCES IN MINIMIZING IRRITATION CAUSED BY ADHESIVE PLASTER

Author Affiliations

Oakland, Calif.

JAMA. 1941;117(21):1783. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.72820470001009
Abstract

Feeling that the degree and amount of irritation produced by adhesive plaster might be minimized by attempting to protect the skin before its application with certain substances, I carried out the series of observations presented in this paper. Previously the investigation of this phenomenon had been directed chiefly toward an effort to determine the factors involved in its production. This was done, undoubtedly, with the object of removing from the plaster the irritants which caused the irriitation. Apparently it is impossible to remove these irritants without reducing the effectiveness of the plaster so far as its adhesive properties are concerned.

Schwartz and Peck1 in 1935 concluded as a result of their studies that the chief irritants were resins and smoke-cured wild rubber and that irritation was due partially to hypersensitivity to one of these ingredients. However, they also felt that some irritation resulted from maceration of the skin from

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