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Article
December 10, 1927

RADIUM IN ADEQUATE DOSAGE IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER

Author Affiliations

Attending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1927;89(24):2035-2039. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690240027009
Abstract

In the few years in which radium has been actively used in the treatment of malignant diseases, it has been subject to very severe criticism. Probably a good deal of this criticism has been warranted. The work is new and in the beginning was, of necessity, empiric. The tissue reactions, in effective dosages, have always been severe. With increasing experience, the severity of these reactions is being much better avoided, relieved or controlled.

Those who had hoped that radium might prove to be the cure for cancer have been disappointed. It has, however, contributed tremendously to the study and treatment of this group of diseases. Improvement in methods of irradiation is dependent on and necessitates more careful histologic and biologic investigation. One must distinguish between radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors.

In spite of the fact that radium is not a specific remedy for cancer, it has come to occupy a well

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