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Editorial
May 24/31, 2016

Dietary Salt, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Health

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine and Center for Vulnerable Populations, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California
JAMA. 2016;315(20):2173-2174. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.5985

What people eat and drink and how it affects health and well-being are subjects of great medical and public health interest. The public is highly invested not only in the taste of food but also in how the composition of micronutrients (minerals, vitamins, water), macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber), and contaminants (eg, pesticides, mercury, lead) in food affects their health. When a person has a recognizable chronic condition, the importance of diet may be even greater. As such, the effect of intakes of high amounts of dietary protein, acid, salt, and other nutrients on health of individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is of interest.14

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