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April 4, 1931

THE INCIDENCE OF BRAIN TUMORS IN EPILEPSYAS REVEALED BY ROUTINE ENCEPHALOGRAPHY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Neurosurgery, Temple University School of Medicine PHILADELPHIA
From the Neurosurgical Clinic of Dr. Temple Fay, Temple University Hospital.

JAMA. 1931;96(14):1118-1121. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720400016004
Abstract

The use of lumbar insufflation of air to replace cerebrospinal fluid has made possible roentgenographic studies of the brain that clearly show the gross lesions and deformities otherwise undemonstrable. Reports of various observers, Friedman, Snow and Kasanin,1 Carpenter,2 Waggoner3 and Pancoast and Fay,4 indicate the value of this procedure in the accurate diagnosis and localization of obscure cerebral lesions.

The convulsions that occur after the third decade of life are usually symptomatic in type and should arouse the suspicion of an organic lesion. Parker,5 in an analysis of 313 cases of brain tumor, found that in 67, or 21.6 per cent, there were major epileptic attacks, and that in 38 cases convulsions were the initial symptom. In 13 of his cases, no other complaint had been present for one or more years preceding the development of other signs and symptoms. Careful studies to determine the

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