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Article
December 20, 1941

THE USE OF COTTON AS A SUTURE MATERIALWITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION

Author Affiliations

EAST LANSING, MICH.; NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery, Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;117(25):2140-2143. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820510028007
Abstract

Fundamentally, surgeons are interested in methods and materials which lead to primary and early wound healing. Dissatisfaction with the results obtained with catgut as a suture material has led to a renewal of interest in nonabsorbable sutures during the past decade. After Bulloch and his co-workers1 in Great Britain, Krönig2 in Germany and Meleney and his associates3 and Clock4 in this country had demonstrated that catgut purchased on the open market was not infrequently contaminated, Whipple,5 who had previously used catgut, strongly advocated the use of silk, with which he was able to show a reduced incidence of infections in clean wounds. This work gave a new impetus to the use of nonabsorbable suture material. a usage initiated in modern surgery by Halsted6 and Kocher7 at the end of the last century.

There exists venerable authority for the use of cotton as surgical

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