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Article
April 4, 1931

SYMPTOMATIC RESPONSE OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IN POLYCYTHEMIA VERA TO INTRAVENOUS USE OF PHYSIOLOGIC SOLUTION OF SODIUM CHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

New York Associate Attending Physician, Lenox Hill Hospital

JAMA. 1931;96(14):1138-1139. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.27220400001011
Abstract

The frequent occurrence of vascular changes in polycythemia vera, involving the peripheral arteries as well as those of the internal organs, have been described and reported.1 Evidence of the changes in the peripheral vessels is manifested by the palpable thickening of the vessel walls and the varying degrees of calcification as demonstrated by roentgenograms. Such changes may give rise to (1) symptoms of claudication, (2) arterial occlusion with gangrene, (3) acroparesthesia, (4) thromboangiitis obliterans and (5) other vasomotor disturbances.2 The diagnosis of involvement of the arteries of the internal organs, particularly the brain and the heart, is dependent chiefly on symptoms referable to these organs and also on the appearance of the retinal vessels.

My purpose in this paper is to present a simple therapeutic measure, within the reach of the average practitioner, which was employed to give relief to the painful accompaniment of peripheral arterial disease in

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