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Article
August 25, 1934

ALLERGIC RESPONSE TO DUST OF INSECT ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

PHOENIX, ARIZ.

JAMA. 1934;103(8):560-562. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750340024007
Abstract

This paper deals with a source of atopen in the group of insect emanations not hitherto demonstrated. The allergic response was observed in persons working on the control of the New Mexico range moth caterpillar and was acquired after contact with the eggs and parasite flies.

There have been a number of recent contributions to the subject of insect allergy. Insect dust sensitization was reported in 1928 by Vaughan,1 who found an allergic response to moth dust contained in feather pillows. Parlato2 in 1929 established the etiologic relation of caddis fly emanations in a patient with seasonal asthma and hay fever. The distressing symptoms occur when the patients go to the lake shore during the caddis fly season. Negative pollen reactions resulted in the search which revealed the excitant in the fine hairs and epithelia shed by the fly. Positive skin reactions and passive transference of sensitization together

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