[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.204.139.136. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 4, 1931

BERLIN

JAMA. 1931;96(14):1162. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720400060025

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Results of the Germano-Russian Syphilis Expedition  Among all competent investigators in the field of syphilis, there is common agreement that the remarkable decline of this terrible scourge in all civilized countries is due chiefly to arsphenamine, which, if properly administered, renders the patient at once incapable of infecting others and thus reduces most decidedly the number of foci of the disease. This obvious benefit derived from arsphenamine, which can scarcely be overestimated, was, however, questioned by a small group of physicians, who raised the common objection that the therapeutic effect of arsphenamine is only apparent and is, furthermore, bought at too dear a price, because sooner or later paralysis or tabes will develop. In support of this view, it was maintained that among primitive peoples, who leave syphilis untreated, these two sequels of syphilis never occur.This statement was of course water on the wheel for the charlatans and was

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×