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Article
September 1, 1934

THE PROBLEM OF ACCIDENTAL POISONING IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

JAMA. 1934;103(9):640-643. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750350004002
Abstract

Toxicology as it has been taught in medical schools has chiefly considered poisons in relation to homicide and suicide and as poisoning occurs in industrial medicine. Less attention is given to accidental poisonings. Textbooks on pediatrics have but little to say regarding accidental poisonings as a problem in diagnosis and treatment in children. Yet poisons are a real menace to the children of this country, as can be shown by hospital records and mortality statistics. These figures do not show nonfatal cases, those cases never seen by physicians, and those in which treatment was given but not placed on record. The experience of every pediatrician proves that poisonings are not infrequent in children. It is also obvious that such cases may not be recognized. Individual physicians see but few cases of any one poisoning, such as strychnine, but in the aggregate the cases amount to a total that goes far

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