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August 9, 2016

Strategies for Health System Innovation After Gobeille v Liberty Mutual Insurance Company

Author Affiliations
  • 1O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington, DC
JAMA. 2016;316(6):581-582. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.8293

In Gobeille v Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, the US Supreme Court imposed a major barrier to states using data to reduce health care costs and improve quality of care for their residents.1 The Court held that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) barred Vermont from requiring self-insured health plans to report data to the state’s all-payer claims database (APCD). All-payer claims databases collect data from private and public payers, including medical, pharmacy, and dental claims, as well as information about insurance eligibility and the health care professionals and facilities that submit claims. Gobeille has far-reaching implications for the ability of states to access comprehensive health information to inform policy making.

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