[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 17, 1942

DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF THE ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and the Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital.

JAMA. 1942;118(3):216-219. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830030034008
Abstract

Twelve years have passed since Berger1 first described the electrical beat of the brain in man. In these twelve years workers all over the world have studied intensively the anatomic, physiologic and psychic correlates of the electroencephalogram.2 More than six hundred articles dealing with this subject have been published and sufficient evidence has been accumulated to indicate the general significance of this new phenomenon and to show that it has practical value for the solution of clinical problems, and also that it has certain definite limitations.

Before proceeding further, I shall define electroencephalography: It is the technic of recording the electrical beat of the brain. As Berger pointed out, this beat is analogous to the beat of the heart as it appears in the electrocardiogram. The brain beat is entirely electrochemical, however; it has no appreciable mechanical component. In the normal waking state the brain does not beat

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×