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Article
September 22, 1934

RESPONSE OF PERITONEAL TISSUE TO DUSTS INTRODUCED AS FOREIGN BODIES

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.; PITTSBURGH
From the Office of Industrial Hygiene and Sanitation, United States Public Health Service, and the Pittsburgh Experimental Station of the United States Bureau of Mines.

JAMA. 1934;103(12):907-912. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750380027006
Abstract

The response of the body tissues to various kinds of dust has been a subject of much interest in recent years. Mavrogordato, Gardner, Gye and others have conducted experiments on the action of inhaled dusts. Kettle1 has studied the response to dusts injected into the subcutaneous tissues and intratracheally, and Policard2 has used the cornea and conjunctiva in his recent studies. In 1924 experiments were begun at the Pittsburgh Station of the United States Bureau of Mines to determine the action and fate of various dusts when injected into the peritoneal cavity of guinea-pigs.3 The conclusions reached at that time were that live animal tissue in all parts of the body tends to react in essentially the same manner to foreign bodies and that fibrous tissue is formed in the peritoneal cavity by quartz and is not formed by limestone and coal. This paper is a continuation

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