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Article
September 29, 1934

Current Comment

JAMA. 1934;103(13):996-997. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750390040015
Abstract

PHYSICAL ALLERGY  The problems of physical allergy, particularly the relationship of cold to sensitivity, are under investigation in many places. The manifestations are striking and, to the patient, a serious problem. A survey of the available literature on the subject offers some interesting comments by older observers. Thus, Salter1 in 1882 said in commenting on asthma: "Until lately I felt no doubt that the asthma was, in these instances, a mere reflex nervous phenomenon, but of late I have seen some cases, not asthmatic, that have shown me how quickly—how immediately, indeed—cold to the surface and extremities may derange the vascular balance of the bronchial mucous membrane, and which suggest, therefore, that even in these asthmatic cases the vascular condition of the bronchial mucous membrane may be the link between the external cold and the bronchial spasm." A case of urticaria due to cold was reported by Fraser2

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