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Article
April 18, 1931

CHRONIC STRIDOR IN CHILDHOODSOMETIMES ERRONEOUSLY ATTRIBUTED TO ENLARGEMENT OF THE THYMUS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Sections on Pediatrics and on Laryngology, Oral and Plastic Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1931;96(16):1286-1289. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720420010004
Abstract

An extensive amount of literature is to be found regarding the thymus and especially its part in causing obstructive respiratory phenomena and sudden death. Chronic stridor, chronic hoarseness, attacks of cyanosis or choking, and certain instances of wheezy respiration are the chief symptoms in infancy and childhood for which it has been held accountable. In many cases in which such symptoms appear, the conclusions that the thymus is the cause of the trouble is reached because of the appearance of the shadow seen on the roentgenographic plate or the fluoroscopic screen. Direct examination of the larynx and trachea is frequently omitted. Reference to such a method of examination is rarely found in the literature dealing with the subject of the thymus, but Pancoast1 recently emphasized the desirability of endoscopic examination in addition to roentgenologic study of these cases.

We have selected for study cases in which the aforementioned symptoms

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