[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 7, 1942

THE MANAGEMENT OF HEMOPHILIAWITH LYOPHILE HUMAN PLASMA INTRAVENOUSLY INJECTED

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Medical Clinics, Strong Memorial and Rochester Municipal Hospitals, Rochester, N. Y.

JAMA. 1942;118(10):799-802. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830100029007
Abstract

In recent years several agents have been proposed in the treatment of hemophilia. However, the most effective treatment today is still the transfusion of compatible blood.1 There are certain inherent difficulties in this method which limit its use practically to critical emergencies for the patient with hemophilia. The typing of blood, which transfusion necessitates, automatically limits the number of possible donors among the acquaintances of the hemophilic family. The limitation becomes more acute as the number of transfusions increases, because of the development of intragroup incompatibilities, as recently discussed by Wiener and Peters.2 The fact that whole blood cannot be preserved and stored for long periods is another limitation. The use of whole blood has saved the lives of patients with hemophilia, but it has done little to relieve the chronic disabilities due to repeated hemorrhages into the joints of these unfortunate patients.

For many years it has

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×