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Article
October 13, 1934

BIRTH CONTROL AND CONTRACEPTION

Author Affiliations

2 East One Hundred and Third Street, New York.

JAMA. 1934;103(15):1169. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750410059023

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  The editorial on "Birth Control and Contraception" in The Journal, September 8, is naturally of interest to the National Committee on Maternal Health, which since 1923 has been studying these and allied questions as problems of public health and the practice of medicine. Since 1929 we have conducted a systematic and comprehensive investigation into the nature and merits of various contraceptive products and methods. The result of the first three years study, done in cooperation with the University of Edinburgh, was published in a volume by Cecil I. B. Voge, Ph.D., F.R.S.E., F.R.S.M., under the title of "The Chemistry and Physics of Contraceptives" (London, Jonathan Cape, 1933).Voge's study established the factual basis for the evaluation of contraceptives in terms of physics, chemistry and biology. The next step was obviously to apply the tests to the commercial products now most widely used and exploited, and concomitantly the

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