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Article
April 4, 1942

AGNOGENIC MYELOID METAPLASIA OF THE SPLEENREPORT OF FIVE CASES ILLUSTRATING DIAGNOSTIC DIFFICULTIES AND THE DANGER OF SPLENECTOMY AND RADIATION THERAPY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Medicine, Lenox Hill Hospital; Hematologist, Hospital for Joint Diseases, and Associate Physician, City Hospital; House Physician, Lenox Hill Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1942;118(14):1200-1204. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830140030010
Abstract

The clinical picture of splenic enlargement with anemia has always been of great interest to the internist, the surgeon and the pathologist. This syndrome is observed from infancy up to old age and is associated with many different conditions, most of which are little understood although they are characterized by definite names. Thus we have only to enumerate such names as erythroblastosis fetalis, Cooley's anemia, chronic subleukemic myelogenous leukemia, splenic anemia and Hodgkin's disease. Each one brings to mind a rather definite clinical and pathologic picture, and yet there are many so-called atypical cases in which the disease defies classification both during life and after death of the patient.

In a recent report Jackson, Parker and Lemon1 integrated as a clinical entity a syndrome characterized by splenic enlargement and the presence of immature red and white cells in the blood. This condition is often erroneously diagnosed as chronic myelogenous

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