[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 4, 1942

ETHER ANESTHESIA IN THE PRESENCE OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Anesthesia and Surgical Services of the Massachusetts General Hospital.; From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Northwestern University Medical School, and the Minnie Frances Kleman Memorial Fund.

JAMA. 1942;118(14):1204-1209. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830140034011
Abstract

Great and sometimes dangerous efforts are made to avoid the use of ether anesthesia when surgery must be carried out on patients who happen to be suffering from tuberculosis; accordingly, it is important to examine the basis for the prejudice against the use of ether for tuberculous patients. As will be observed, this prejudice does not appear to be established on a secure foundation. We have therefore studied the results of using ether in operations on a carefully followed series of patients and have compared our results with those from other clinics.

Our wish to give ether an adequate trial was based on extensive observations, made in many general surgery clinics as well as our own, that ether is extraordinarily well tolerated by the cachectic patient and by the patient whose respiratory and circulatory systems may be grossly impaired.1

CURRENT BASIS FOR THE PREJUDICE AGAINST THE USE 

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×