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Article
November 3, 1934

Current Comment

JAMA. 1934;103(18):1382-1383. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750440042017
Abstract

NOBEL PRIZE AWARDS IN MEDICINE  The Nobel prize in medicine for 1934 was awarded last week to three physicians of the United States: Drs. George R. Minot and William P. Murphy of Boston and Dr. George H. Whipple of Rochester, N. Y. The sum to be awarded is reported to be $41,000. The research leading to the present clinical use of liver in pernicious anemia has been repeatedly reviewed in these columns. Many of the significant studies appeared first in The Journal. Briefly, Whipple and his associates showed that certain foods, especially liver, will induce rapid regeneration of blood in dogs made anemic by bleeding. Thereafter, Minot and Murphy applied the method clinically, made controlled studies in the hospital, and published their most significant early paper in The Journal in August 1926. One may, as is usual in such cases, find occasional references to the use of liver in the

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