[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 2, 1931

THE SALIVARY GLANDS AND THE MECHANISM OF THIRST

JAMA. 1931;96(18):1506. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720440054012
Abstract

The sensation of hunger is usually referred to the stomach; that of thirst to the pharyngeal region. Both sensations may be regarded as protective signals that warn the living organism of the need for regularity in the intake of nutriment. In respect to its intensity and untoward consequences, thirst is far more serious than hunger. Men have starved over long periods—more than a month—when water was available; but deprivation of fluid for more than seventy-two hours inevitably leads to death from thirst. A loss of one fifth of the water of the body is serious. In relation to the duration of life, water has an importance between that of food and that of oxygen. It is more vital than food and less vital than oxygen. Despite this significance of lack of water, less is known about the actual nature of thirst, the index of the deprivation of water, than about

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×