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April 25, 1942

THE ALLEGED EFFICIENCY OF MEDICINAL TREATMENT OF TYPHOID CARRIERS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Departments of Pharmacology and of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

JAMA. 1942;118(17):1447-1449. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830170025006
Abstract

Because typhoid carriers are denied occupations involving food handling and care of children, are kept under surveillance by health departments and fear the possible infection of others, their successful treatment is greatly to be desired. Successful treatment would also be important in the present war emergency so as to prevent and control spread of the infection in military establishments. To this end, two general procedures and agents have been proposed: (1) the removal of foci of typhoid micro-organisms, usually by cholecystectomy, and (2) the administration of drugs which might be bactericidal. Curative results have been claimed for both these procedures.

For instance, Bigelow and Anderson1 in 1933 and Coller and Forsbeck2 in 1937 are among those who have reported cures by removal of the gallbladder. This is, however, a major undertaking, which fails to cure the patient in a considerable number of instances. For this reason, others have

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