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Article
November 24, 1934

CARCINOMA OF THE CECUM: WHAT ARE THE CHANCES FOR CURE?

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1934;103(21):1605-1607. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750470027006
Abstract

The question to which I wished to find an answer was whether a patient who has remained well for at least five years following resection of a segment of the colon because of carcinoma may be classified as cured. Considerable doubt may rightly exist as to whether or not this question is answerable. Some persons apparently are inherently susceptible to the development of malignant processes. Examples are the multiple carcinomas, each of a distinctly different type, occurring simultaneously or consecutively in the same patient. Malignant lesions of the colon, for the most part, are single (except those which apparently arise from malignant degeneration accompanying multiple polyposis). Radical removal is the most effective means of relief, and while the ultimate outcome in many cases is disastrous, encouragement in the surgical treatment of carcinoma of the large intestine is spurred on by those persons who, once victims of the disease, have remained

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