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May 9, 1942

ANNUAL CONGRESS ON MEDICAL EDUCATION AND LICENSURE

Author Affiliations

Stanford University, Calif., Presiding

JAMA. 1942;119(2):206-214. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.72830190008020

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Abstract

COUNCIL ON MEDICAL EDUCATION AND HOSPITALS  February 16—Morning

Medical Care of Civilian Population During War  Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, Stanford University, Calif.: War, from the selection of the soldier down to his return to his home after war, compels the very best of medical service. Physicians who join the services are dislocated from their normal environment and they must learn new technics and new mass procedures in order to get properly done the large amount of medical work required. We need think only of the blood bank to realize what differences in procedure there are between now and the Spanish American War or even the first World War. The skills to be learned by the physician are more intricate, more precise and more effective than ever before. The call for good medical care is of primary importance. We must take it for granted as we build up a larger army

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