[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.197.114. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 383
Citations 0
The Art of JAMA
September 27, 2016

Sunset on the SeaJohn Frederick Kensett

JAMA. 2016;316(12):1244-1245. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.14499

In mid-19th century America, artists were faced with a dilemma. Living and working in a relatively new nation, they did not know exactly how to define American art. While Europe would seem like a useful place to find examples, it had a deeper well of culture from which to draw; in the United States there was a paucity of viable artistic subjects. The country did not have a breadth of historical accounts or myths, monied patrons were few, and cultural infrastructures like art schools and museums were not available to build and foster art-minded communities. Yet these artists did find one national characteristic that seemed unique to their country, one that could easily be viewed, rendered, disseminated to the public, and lay the foundation for the first national school of art.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×