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Article
April 14, 1928

MODERN PRECEPTORSHIPSTHE VALUE OF ASSOCIATE TEACHING CENTERS IN CLINICAL TEACHING

Author Affiliations

Dean, University of Wisconsin Medical School MADISON, WIS.

JAMA. 1928;90(15):1177-1181. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690420005002
Abstract

"I will impart a knowledge of the art to my sons and those of my teachers and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine but to none others" states the Hippocratic Oath. Our own social organization differs widely from that in which this oath was formulated. The factory has replaced the trade guild, standardized quantity production for the average, works of art for the individual. Skill of eye and hand, skill in the choice of means in the midst of complexity, skill in personal service are, however, as essential in medical practice today as they were in ancient Greece. The preservation of medicine as an art requires close association of master and apprentice. The pedagogic obligations of the Hippocratic Oath are not outgrown.

In the endeavor to improve medical education in this country, its control has passed from the medical profession to the

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