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Article
June 20, 1942

PNEUMONIA IN A RURAL PRACTICEITS INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY

Author Affiliations

SWANVILLE, MINN.

JAMA. 1942;119(8):620-623. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830250016006
Abstract

This paper has as its object the portrayal of the care of pneumonia patients and the results of such care by the general practitioner or family doctor in an average rural American community. The community involved is a town of 435 population in a strictly agricultural district. It is felt that such practices typify customary rural treatment of pneumonia and its results under the American system of medicine. Contrast of this work with similar studies conducted in urban and teaching centers provides a yardstick by which to measure the average medical care in rural United States.

On Jan. 1, 1937 the Minnesota Department of Health started typing sputum for pneumococci without cost to the patient or attending physician. When requested, type specific serum was provided at cost, or without cost if the patient was unable to pay.

As will be recalled, this was before the use of the sulfonamides. Type

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