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June 20, 1942

CHRONIC LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIAREPORT OF A CASE, WITH SURVIVAL FOR SIXTEEN YEARS

Author Affiliations

Salt Lake City
From the Department of Medicine, Salt Lake Clinic.

JAMA. 1942;119(8):632. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.72830250003008b
Abstract

Few diseases are more puzzling than the leukemias. Practically nothing is known of their etiology; no specific curative treatment is known; the prognosis is uniformly poor; even the length of survival varies within wide limits.

In chronic lymphatic leukemias the survival period averages around three years. Dowdy and Lawrence1 found an average of 2.7 years in a series of 20 cases, with the longest five years. In a series of 87 cases, Minot and Isaacs2 found an average survival period of two years, with the longest twenty-two years. Murphy's3 cases averaged 3.45 years, but in 1 case there had been symptoms for twelve years, and in 3 cases chronic lymphatic leukemia had been diagnosed for more than nine years. McGavran4 reported a case of twenty-five years' duration. Hunter5 observed that the disease seems more benign in patients over 65 and noted an occasional nine or

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