[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.19.31. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 16, 1931

MEDICAL FACILITIES OF DETROIT AND PHILADELPHIA AND THE MIGRATORY PHYSICIAN

JAMA. 1931;96(20):1696-1697. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720460042012
Abstract

Two of the recently published reports of the Committee on the Costs of Medical Care5 afford new insight into the economics of medical practice. The reports concern the medical facilities of Philadelphia and of Detroit. The people of Philadelphia spent $54 per capita for the prevention of disease and the care of the sick in 1928. Of this amount 26 per cent was paid to physicians, 13 per cent to dentists, 6 per cent to other practitioners and 27 per cent to hospitals; drugs and medicines cost 20 per cent, and 2 per cent was spent for public health services. The number of physicians per hundred thousand of population in Philadelphia has decreased from 209 in 1906 to 197 in 1929. The main difficulty with medical practice in Philadelphia, according to the investigators, was the multiplicity of agencies without effective coordination. There seemed to be plenty of physicians and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×