January 5, 1935

The Etiology and Treatment of Spasmodic Bronchial Asthma

Author Affiliations

By H. Gordon Oliver, M.D. With a foreword by W. Langdon Brown, M.D., F.R.C.P., Regius Professor of Physic, Cambridge University. Boards. Price, 3s. 6d. Pp. 48, with 10 charts. London: H. K. Lewis & Company, Ltd., 1934.

JAMA. 1935;104(1):71. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760010073032

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There is still too much speculation about the etiology of bronchial asthma. The treatment likewise is complicated and in many cases unsatisfactory. There can be no doubt that asthma is an allergic disease and that pollens and foods play a most important part. The author in a brief monograph reports fifty cases observed in ten years. In all of these the fungus Monilia was found in the sputum and the patients were all benefited by iodides and a vaccine. He courageously concludes that all cases of asthma are due to a mycotic infection of the Monilia organism. The number of cases, however, is too small and they are too localized to justify such definite conclusions.

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