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Article
January 12, 1935

THE BIOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF LEAD IN THE BODY

JAMA. 1935;104(2):87-90. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760020003002
Abstract

In the last ten years, a great deal of work has appeared bearing on the biochemistry of lead. To combine this new knowledge with that summarized in a previous publication1 is my purpose in this article.

In regard to absorption there is little important new evidence. The experience in industry confirms what has been found in the laboratory1—that lead which is inhaled is far more toxic than lead which is swallowed. Of course, it is likewise generally conceded that ingested lead is a hazard.

The form in which lead is transported in the blood stream is of practical as well as scientific interest, as it has a bearing in guiding intelligent therapy. The prevailing opinion had long been that lead was carried as an albuminate, but Fairhall's equilibrium experiments,1 as well as our blood studies with Reznikoff,1 convinced us that lead was precipitated in the

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