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Article
January 12, 1935

THE TREATMENT OF PERMANENT PARALYSIS OF THE DELTOID MUSCLE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children.

JAMA. 1935;104(2):99-103. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760020015005
Abstract

Permanent paralysis of the deltoid muscle causes a crippling, disabling deformity of the arm with the resultant loss of power of abduction of the involved extremity. When conservative treatment, extending over a period of one year, has failed there remain several methods of surgical treatment by which, if successful, varying degrees of function may be restored to the paralyzed member. The results of neurotization and nerve transference with anastomosis are of doubtful value.

There are two methods, namely, arthrodesis and muscle transposition, that have established their practicability, as evidenced by a number of successful results. Each of these methods has its advantages and disadvantages. In favor of arthrodesis is the greater likelihood of success and the greater strength and power of the functional force at the shoulder, at the expense of mobility. In favor of muscle transposition is the possibility of greater range of motion at the shoulder but with

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