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Article
June 16, 1928

RUPTURE OF HEPATIC ABSCESS INTO THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY AND INFERIOR VENA CAVA

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

JAMA. 1928;90(24):1929-1930. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690510013005
Abstract

Rupture occurs in about 28 per cent of all cases of hepatic abscess.1 In 168 cases reported in Tice's Practice of Medicine, the pleura, pericardium and lungs lead in relative frequency as to the site into which rupture may occur. The stomach, colon, lumbar region, bile ducts, inferior vena cava and kidney follow in order with rare case reports.1 Waring,2 as early as 1854, in a series of sixty-eight ruptures, reported three cases of liver abscess communicating with the inferior vena cava either directly or indirectly through the right hepatic vein. In one of these patients the abscess was single, in the other two multiple. The largest opening in the vein that I have found reported is that in Colin's3 case in 1873: "The autopsy showed the abscess connected with the inferior vena cava by an opening the size of a franc piece." The abscess was

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