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Comment & Response
November 1, 2016

Association of a Genetic Risk Score With Body Mass Index

Author Affiliations
  • 1MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
JAMA. 2016;316(17):1825-1826. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.14933

To the Editor Dr Walter and colleagues1 reported that a polygenic risk score for body mass index (BMI) showed a differential association across different birth cohorts. For people born between 1900 and 1958, the magnitude of association of the risk score with BMI was reduced compared with people born later. They suggested that changes in the environment may modify the effect of genetic variants associated with BMI. This is an intriguing possibility. Obesity is a known risk factor for a number of adverse health outcomes that lead to increased mortality among individuals with high BMI.2,3

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