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October 17, 1942

HANDBOOK OF NUTRITION: XIVUNUSUAL FOODS OF HIGH NUTRITIVE VALUE

Author Affiliations

Reference Librarian ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1942;120(7):529-535. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.82830420003011
Abstract

The successful prosecution of this war, as stressed by Herbert Hoover1 during World War I, imposes a responsibility on the food exporting countries of the world; namely, that of providing adequate supplies of food for themselves and for their allies. There is no practical way to get food to any part of western Europe now except Great Britain without postponing the winning of the war, but when the war is won the additional gigantic problem will arise of finding food for much of Europe and for Asia. It is probable that many hundred million people will be starving then. It is presumed that half the populations of the occupied countries and Spain are starving now.

Vice President Henry Wallace1a has estimated that the wheat in storage in Canada, the United States, Australia and Argentina would cover the import requirements of Europe for nearly three years. The amount of

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