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Article
July 14, 1928

THE MANAGEMENT OF TARSAL AND METATARSAL FRACTURES

JAMA. 1928;91(2):81-84. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02700020015005
Abstract

It has been customary to lavish praise on the structure of the human hand as representing the highest development of specialized function of the extremities and typifying a specialization characteristic of man as distinguished from other primates. The foot is apt to be regarded as an organ which once in the phylogeny of man was more specialized than the present member, which is inferred to be degenerating and, within the narrow limits of civilized foot-gear, becoming distorted and progressively less useful.

In the light of the more recent contributions to comparative anatomy—for example, the studies on arboreal man by Keith1 and by Jones2—it seems clear that in mechanical construction and function there is no essential distinction between the hand of man and that of many of the anthropoids, whereas the adaptation of the foot of man to terrestrial progression has developed a specifically human organ. Although the

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