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November 21, 1942

THE FEEDING OF HEALTHY INFANTS AND CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Department of Pediatrics, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1942;120(12):913-921. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.82830470003011
Abstract

THE FEEDING OF INFANTS  Human milk commonly is considered the ideal food for the young infant, presumably supplying all nutritional essentials for the early period with the exception of adequate vitamin D. When human milk is not available, cow's milk is the material most commonly used in substitution. It seems desirable to review the comparisons of these two foods as to their contents of various nutritional essentials and their effects on the growth and body composition of the infant. Comparative contents of the two milks are shown in tables 1 and 2.The protein requirement of the infant commonly is stated on the basis of the average amount received in human milk when he is making good growth progress. The amount of protein received by the young infant under these circumstances is 2 to 2.5 Gm. for each kilogram of body weight. Acceptance of the concept, not clearly proved, that

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