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January 16, 1943

CUTANEOUS CHANGES IN THE SPRUE SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Virginia Department of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;121(3):168-173. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840030006002
Abstract

The sprue syndrome has become familiar to physicians everywhere through the large literature1 which has accumulated since its original descriptions by Hillary in 1759, and independently by Manson and by Van der Burg in 1880. While sprue is common in certain tropical countries, which accounts for the designation "tropical sprue," recent publications by American and European authors have emphasized the importance of sprue as a widespread and frequently unrecognized disease of the temperate zone. From the many conflicting opinions of the past, two fundamental concepts regarding the nature of sprue have emerged: (1) that celiac disease in children, tropical sprue and nontropical sprue are variations of a single disease complex, the sprue syndrome,2 and (2) that sprue is a disease often due to nutritional deficiency.3

Lesions of the tongue and oral mucous membranes in sprue have been well described and are regarded as of great diagnostic and

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