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Article
January 23, 1943

EPIDEMIC KERATOCONJUNCTIVITISCLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AN OUTBREAK IN NEW YORK CITY FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON THE SPECIFIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A VIRUS AND THE DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Bacteriology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;121(4):250-255. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840040026007
Abstract

Information concerning epidemic keratoconjunctivitis has, for the most part, been limited to clinical descriptions. Because the incidence of the disease in the United States has increased rapidly since its appearance in California two years ago, further information on the status of the etiologic agent and its mode of spread is desirable.

Initial efforts in this direction were made when, early in 1942, a few cases were observed in New York City and a virus was isolated.1 The present investigation deals with 80 cases examined and treated at the office of a local ophthalmologist. These cases were studied from the clinical, epidemiologic and experimental aspects.

CLINICAL ASPECTS  While epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is certainly a distinct clinical entity, and while it has a well defined symptomatology in fully developed cases, it should be stressed that the beginning signs and symptoms are often indefinite and vary so greatly that in the early stages

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