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Article
January 23, 1943

CONTINUOUS CAUDAL ANALGESIA IN OBSTETRICS—A METHOD FOR SAFE, PAINLESS CHILDBIRTH

JAMA. 1943;121(4):260-261. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840040036011
Abstract

Elsewhere in this issue appear two papers by Hingson and Edwards1 and by Gready and Hesseltine2 dealing with a method called continuous caudal analgesia, used in obstetrics for the relief of pain during childbirth. The method, which is a natural outgrowth of the development of local, spinal and caudal anesthesia, was first used in obstetrics in the U. S. Public Health Service Marine Hospital at Stapleton on Staten Island, New York, on Jan. 6, 1942. Since that time the method has been tried in some nineteen clinics associated with medical schools and well established hospitals. Altogether some 589 women have been delivered of babies by this method without maternal mortality and with but 3 instances in which infants died—these without reference to the method of analgesia that was employed.

As will be observed by a careful reading of the articles, the technic is one which demands the competent

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