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February 27, 1943

TWO ADDITIONAL CASES OF TRAUMATIC WINGED SCAPULA OCCURRING IN THE ARMED FORCES

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1943;121(9):667-668. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.62840090002011a
Abstract

In a recent issue of The Journal Ilfeld and Holder1 reported a case of traumatic paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle seen in their service at Camp Callan, California. The winged scapula in their patient resulted from trauma incidental to carrying a full knapsack. Two cases of paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle were seen at the Station Hospital, Langley Field, Virginia, in September. Because of the rarity of this condition and the unusual cause of these 2 cases, the findings seemed important enough to record in the medical literature.

Case 1.—  Private W. Q., aged 26, admitted to the Station Hospital Sept. 24, 1942, complained of a recurrent dislocation of his left shoulder on lifting heavy objects. He gave a history of having his left shoulder slip "out of place" when he lifted a garbage can on Sept. 16, 1942 while working with a prison detail. Although right

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