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Article
March 6, 1943

MAPHARSEN IN THE TREATMENT OF CONGENITAL SYPHILISWITH ESPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF THE INTRAMUSCULAR METHOD OF ADMINISTRATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, and from the Department of Pediatrics, Metropolitan Hospital, and from the Skin and Cancer Unit, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

JAMA. 1943;121(10):746-752. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840100032009
Abstract

Mapharsen, which was studied and introduced by Tatum and Cooper,1 was investigated clinically by O. H. Foerster, who made the first report on the use of this drug in antisyphilitic therapy for human beings at the meeting of the American Dermatological Association in 1933.2 Since then numerous investigators3 have published articles on the therapeutic efficacy of this drug as well as on its toxicity. Most of the investigators agree that mapharsen is a good antisyphilitic drug4 and that it is less toxic than neoarsphenamine.5

The fact that only six fatalities6 resulting from the use of mapharsen have been reported, while over 12 million ampules of this drug have been manufactured,7 makes this trivalent arsenical very suitable for antisyphilitic therapy.

The value of mapharsen in congenital syphilis was studied by us8 as well as by Morgan,9 Howles10 and Wile11 and

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