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Article
June 29, 1935

THE CLINICAL USE OF ANESTHETIC AGENTS AND METHODSCHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Anesthesia, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1935;104(26):2313-2315. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760260001001
Abstract

It has been suggested that I discuss the extent to which the inexperienced person may be justified in using certain anesthetic agents, in comparison with persons who are experienced in the use of these agents.

The factor that should receive first consideration in the clinical use of an anesthetic agent is safety both at the time of administration and subsequently. It seems best to discuss each agent separately and briefly and to stress general principles that seem to me controversial only in isolated instances.

Derivatives of Barbituric Acid.—  In certain emergency cases any practicing physician is justified in using the barbiturates in large doses: for example, in cases of tetanus, eclampsia of pregnancy, or convulsions caused by meningitis or by strychnine poisoning. A derivative of barbituric acid is most effective when given intravenously. The Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association has issued two valuable reports on

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