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Article
March 13, 1943

HOW TO GET ALONG WITH LESS HELPLEGITIMATE SHORT CUTS TO ROUTINE SERVICE CAN WE SECURE AND TRAIN TECHNICAL ASSISTANTS FOR CERTAIN ROUTINE INDUSTRIAL HEALTH PROCEDURES?

JAMA. 1943;121(11):820-822. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840110022008
Abstract

In these wartimes, among the many problems confronting us in the practice of industrial medicine and surgery, is the necessity of doing more work in a shorter period of time with less help. The very rapid expansion of some of our industries has placed tremendous demands on the medical profession. Not only has the actual enlistment of trained industrial medical personnel depleted our forces, but one of our sources of available medical personnel is almost completely gone. These are the young physicians and surgeons who have completed their internships and residencies and normally would be part time medical members in industry from two to five years or more. Practically all of these young men are taken into military service immediately on completion of their internships. Those available because they have been rejected from military service are very few, and even then more interesting or lucrative opportunities attract their services.

The

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